1910s Cemetery Book — Pages 22 and 23

[Other pages from the book are indexed on the “Blog Multi-Part Series” page.]

Although only one entry is rather startling (“smothered, case for coroner”), what may be somewhat surprising is a the lack of causes of death linked to World War I. Was there a different system for recording the burials of soldiers?

Another curious entry is that of De Hart. One wonders why he was actually buried five days after being placed in the vault. Were family members coming from a distance?

Page 22
December 23, 1916 — Henry C. Wallace — Paralysis — Springfield, Ohio
December 27, 1916 — Infant of Marie Charles — Still born —Springfield, Ohio
January 5, 1917 — Mary Madeline Arthur — Chronic nephritis — Springfield, Ohio
January 16, 1917 — Robt. E. Johnson — Lobar pneumonia — Springfield, Ohio
February 3, 1917 put in vault, February 8 buried — Henry G. De Hart — Diabetes miletis — Springfield, Ohio
February 6, 1917 — Mrs. E. L. Mellinger — Cancer of stomach — Yellow Springs, Ohio
February 10, 1917, — H. E. Turner — Pochy[?] meningitis — Yellow Springs, Ohio
March 28, 1917 — Robert Armstrong — Colitis with diarrhea — Yellow Springs, Ohio
April 2, 1917 — Babe Shelby Stanley-Waugh — smother, case for coroner — near Yellow Springs, Ohio
April 3, 1917 — Amanda E. Ramsey — Acute peritonitis —Springfield, Ohio
April 4, 1917 — Chas. Willis — Mitral iinsufficiency — Xenia, Ohio
April 6, 1917 — John Smedley — Lobar Pneumonia — Lima, Ohio
April 28, 1917 — Ellsworth Johnson — Pul. Tuberculosis — Springfield, Ohio

PAGE 23
April 28, 1917 — Ellsworth Johnson — Pul. Tubercular — Springfield, Ohio
May 5, 1917 — Sarah C. Wright — Cerebral Apoplexy — Columbus, Ohio
May 16, 1917 — Susan P. Gecci[?] — Interstitial nephritis age 93 — Springfield, Ohio
May 24, 1917 — Bruce L. Garrison — Abscess of liver —Lovelock, Nevada
May 26, 1917 — John M. Birch — Lobar pneumonia — Dayton, Ohio
June 2, 1917 — Cora May Benning — Aortal insufficiency — Yellow Springs, Ohio
June 7, 1917 — Lewis P. Hathaway — Apoplexy — Springfield, Ohio
June 12, 1917 — Sarah E. Hursh[?] — Apoplexy — Springfield, Ohio
June 15, 1917 — Miss Bessie May Lawson — Stomatitis —Yellow Springs, Ohio
June 18, 1917 — F. B. Curl — Acute cardiac dilation — Dayton Sol. Home
June 25, 1917 — Robt. Lewis Haughey — Premature birth — Springfield, Ohio
June 26, 1917 — Infant male, Crumrine — Premature birth — Yellow Springs, Ohio
July 5, 1917 — Margaret B. Williams — Tuberculosis — Los Angeles, California

 

 

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Old Hotel Life

From another old newspaper article with no source noted, but since the content is a reprint, at least we have the date and source of the reprinted material.

These advertisements describing the delights of the Yellow Springs Hotel almost 200 years are a blend of hyperbole (“…equal, if not superior to any in the United States) and modesty (“The stabling will not be very good”).

What does it tell us about resort life that the first amenity mentioned is the bar?

Take note of the list of ailments our now problematic water was supposed to treat, and also note the emphasis on locally-sourced food.


OLD PAPERS TELL STORIES OF EARLY HOTEL LIFE HERE

The following interesting articles came to us through the courtesy of the Reed Book Shop which makes a specialty of dealing in old books and papers. The articles below were taken from copies of The Piqua Gazette of 1823. While they are in the form of advertisements yet they give a clue to the beginning of the hotel period of Yellow Springs and the Glen nearby.

We believe this is the best information available as to the opening of the first hotel. From this time on the place grew in favor with the public up until the Civil War time. For some years prior to the war the place was known as one of the finest watering places of the country. At one time five hotels were in operation, the largest was on the site as described below

HEALTH AND RECREATION
The Keeper of the Yellow Springs Hotel

Respectfully informs the public, that he is now prepared to receive company, and will endeavor to render them comfortable, during the present watering season. His Bar will always be supplied with the choicest assortment of liquors, foreign fruits etc. etc. and no expense will be spared to supply his table with every article which the country can furnish.

To those whose sole object is health, the Subscriber can say, with confidence that he believes they will not be disappointed. Cases, especially, of general debility, affections of the liver, nervous affections, chronic and acute rheumatisms, dyspepsia, scrofula, weakness of sight, hypochondria etc. may be relieved here, if they can be at any mineral springs in America. The water is a strong and active chalybeate, (the best of tonics) cool and pleasant to the taste, and so extremely light, that, large quantities may be drank, by the most feeble, without the slightest danger. The showering baths are equal, if not superior to any in the United States.

To those who come for pleasure, or to relax the mind from business or study, he can say, that his amusements, though not of the city order, afford an agreeable and healthy exercise. He has beautiful and shaded pleasure grounds, safe and excellent swings, patent bob-logics, etc. etc. besides a most romantic and picturesque country, delightful for rambling, and abounding in almost every kind of game, to be found in the western forests.

Every reasonable attention will be paid to all his guests, and especially will every kindness and indulgence be shewn to those who may seek here for health.

The charges will be moderate.

Reports are already in circulation, that these premises have been pur[chas?]ed ,by a company, who are about to form a “Community” here, on the system of the celebrated Mr. Owen. The Subscriber assures his friends that this is not a fact; nor does he believe it will ever take place. He has no expectation of quitting the Springs during the present season, nor for some years to come. If however, contrary tohis present belief,) the above project should be persisted in, and a sale be effected; and should he determine to surrender possession at any time during the summer; the Public will not be losers by it, as the new proprietors would continue the accommodations, without any intermission, and be much more able to extend and improve them.

J. B. Gardiner
Yellow Springs, Greene Co.
YELLOW SPRINGS HOTEL
Greatest Watering Place of the Western World

The Subscriber has been in the occupancy of this celebrated Watering Place since September last, during which time he has been assiduously engaged in preparing accommodations for various visitors during the ensuing summer, in the best manner which his time and means afford. He has now completed all the improvements, which he designs to make at present, and is ready for the reception of company. Although his buildings, pleasure grounds etc. are not as extensive and well finished, as he is in hopes they will be at a future day; and all the expectations of the public may not be fully realized. Still he can with confidence assure visitors, that their situation will be rendered at least Convenient and Comfortable. His new buildings are so constructed that families of several in number, can be accommodated entirely to themselves; and there are also a variety of small rooms, very pleasant, for single gentlemen and ladies.

The Subscriber has not yet been able to fulfil his intention of preparing tepid baths this season: in another year he expects to furnish them. The cold bath, however, he believes would gernerally be preferred at this place. He has erected in a most delightful and sequestered grove of cedars a new shower house, solely for the accommodation of ladies. The old one has been thoroughly repaired, with new aqueducts, for gentlemen.

The pleasure grounds are considered improved, though susceptible of great additional convenience and decoration.

At the bar of the Yellow Springs Hotel will always be found a choice assortment of liquors, together with all the foreign an native fruits, which can be procured in this county.

The table will be carefully supplied with every variety and delicacy which the neighborhood affords. The world does not furnish a more eligible situation for a Springs House than the one on these premises; and at no place can the valuable articles of Milk and Butter be furnished in a better state.

It may be satisfactory under this head, to assure the public that the Subscriber always keeps his own cows in pasture fields; and that he will never purchase either butter or beef from any but persons well known tohim, and who always pasture their cattle. This assurance is deemed more necessary in this advertisement, as a disease, vulgarly called the sick stomach, has at times prevailed in this vicinity supposed to have originated from making use of the milk, butter and meat of cattle which fed in the woods and prairies, where, it is said, there is a certain poisonous vine or weed, which proves fatal to cattle, and even persons who dieet on their produce. The best informed physicians, however who have long practiced where this disease prevailed, do not attribute it to the cause above stated. Of late years it has almost entirely disappeared from this neighborhood.

The stabling will not be very good. The Subscriber has not yet had it in his power to erect new buildings for this purpose. He will however, promise to furnish excellent hay and grain, good pasturage, and attendtive hostlers.

It is not an uncommon enquiry, in this prudent age of retrenchmnent, “What will be the price?” To this Subscriber can only reply, that at every watearing place the requisitions of guests are so various, and the necessary attentions to some so much greater than to others, that no general rule can be made applicable to all. The terms must vary according to the necessities of the visitor. Where extra room, servants, and other attendance are required the price will be proportionately enhanced. Also, when separate rooms are demanded, the price will be greater, than when two or more persons occupy the same room. The subscriber trusts that he will never be justly chargable with extortion. His character as an Innkeeper at the metropolis of the state for many years, will acquit him of suspicion. Nevertheless, he does not solicit the company of those, who would wish to receive his labor and attention for nothing. It is as impossible for himself and family to “live on art,” as for the debilitated to be entirely restored, without resorting to the Yellow Springs.

To travellers, and occasional visitors, the prices will be the same as at the respectable taverns in the neighboring towns.

While the Subscriber pledges to his guests every exertion in his power to render their tarry here pleasant and salutary, he relies with confidence upon the munificence of an enlightened public to reimburse the heavy expence which has with difficulty incurred and to encourage him to progress in establishing, in one of the most healthy and delightful parts of the western worlds, a Summer Resort for the fortunate sick and afflicted, the young, the gay and the fashionable; which, in its infinite natural advantages, is not surpassed, if equalled, by Ballston, Saratoga, Bedford, or any other Springs in the United States.

J. B. Gardiner
May 20th, 1823

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From the Antioch Bookplate Archives — 1970s part 8

The latter half of the 1970s showed a focus on full-color, offset-printed bookplates. The company tried to develop designs for a wide range of styles, ages and interests, as even this small sample demonstrates.

(B-114 was a reworking of earlier design X-19, shown in an earlier post.)

B-116 would become a perpetual bestseller, never dropped from the catalog.

B-119 was painted by staff artist Linda K. Nelson in the style of Alphonse Mucha.

Antioch bookplate B-112

B-112

Antioch bookplate B-113

B-113

Antioch bookplate B-115

B-115

Antioch bookplate B-116

B-116

Antioch bookplate B-117

B-117

Antioch bookplate B-118

B-118

Antioch bookplate B-119

B-119

Antioch bookplate B-120

B-120

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Early Political Passion

Don’t forget the Yellow Springs Historical Society program tomorrow, Sunday, March 12, at 2:00 pm in the Senior Center Great Room on the history of the Little Miami Railroad, to be given by Dave Neuhardt.

The railroad was important to the success of Yellow Springs as a resort destination, as in the article below, another undated and unsourced document collected by Mary E. Morgan.

The tone of the article might seem familiar, given the nature of the recent election, and there appears to be an early version of a “tweetstorm” put to use, although its contents were not included in the article.

Y ELLOW SPRINGS 99 YEARS AGO

The following interesting item was taken for the Cincinnati Enquirer and -published in the Yellow Springs News dated January 22, 1882.

“Away back in olden time, when parties in politics, after remaining dormant during the eight years of Monroe’s administration, again organized after the election of John Quincy Adams as President in 1824, although receiving but a majority of the popular vote, when compared to that given to General Jackson, the writer has frequently spoken of the bitter  feelings of the contest of 1828, when the great wrong of 1824 in the election of Mr. Adams was righted by that of General Jackson. That contest was so exciting that men and women, and boys—I was one of the latter—took part. The merchants, the lawyers, the doctors were nearly all for Adams; nearly every town in Ohio was strongly in favor, while the Jackison men were found almost exclusivcely among those that by the sweat of their face earned their living. A private letter, written to a gentleman of high social standing in Cincinnati from a visitor at the “Yellow Springs” in Greene County, then the great watering place of the West, gives an episode in politics showing the animus of that great contest. If its interest to the reader of “Old Time Politics” is one-tenth as great as it is to the writer of this it will repay a perusal. The letter is addressed to Morgan Neville, a strong Jacksonian, and marked “to be read when you have nothing else to do” and is as follows:

Yellow Springs, Ohio, Aug. 22, 1828

My Dear Sir: I feel disappointed in not having some news concerning the cause, but hope I shall know all about “Old Kaintuck,” at least by this evening’s mail. Yesterday a circular of Colonel Davis and Ben Drake was received by Mr. Mills (the landlord of the Yellow Springs House) informing him that Mr. Clay would be in Cincinnati, and his friends were informed that they could see him, etc; also a letter from Charles Hammond stating that Mr. Clay would partake of a cold collation in Cincinnati, and that he would endeavor to send him by the Yellow Springs.

It is very pleasant here—so many sources of amusement for all who are capable of enjoying them. I have suffered much with my left breast and side, awing to a tartar plaster I applied. The disease, however, has been removed by it from my lungs and liver.

I think I can pass here for a very active Jacksonian. We are very few here, I assure you. Out of eighty there is only Miss Reilly amd Mrs. Macallister, Corwin, Yorke, Drs. Wright and Wolfe and your humbe servant in favor of the hero. On Tuesday last, the ladies selected championis to decide the great question by a game of ten-pins, General Flornoy for the administration, and young Corwin, the planter, for Jackson.

The General was beat by one in the game—accordingly he was crowned in a manner becoming to a victor, with a wreath of oak, and his party adopted a leaf or twig for a badge; the others hoisted the hickory. The General’s (Flornoy’s) party, not satisfied with the conquest, cornation, etc, but they must celebrate their conquest in song for in the evening (the same on which I arrived) there appeared on the gauze of the mirror, over the mantel in the drawing room an impromptu. Findlay who was here then wrote a parody on it, and Mrs. Macallister attached it to the bottom of the first piece. Shortly afterward a third appeared, and then a fourth, when some well-dressed person attached the fifth set of lines which should and were intended to conclude the subject. The next day however, after Findlay had left us, and we had no poet or rhymster, the sixth set were inserted between the fourth and fifth. This no Jacksonian could read without considering it an outrage upon his feelings. For myself, it threw me into a fever, and it was with difficulty I could copy the lines, in order to have them replied to. If ever a poor devil stood in need of the burning pen of a Byron, requires a meekness which we vagabonds don’t generally possess. I went immediately to my room and with Corwin’s assistance ground the seventh set. Miss Reilly attched them to the sixth about sundown, while the company were at tea. As soon as they returned, it was percieved, and you may depend it took effect. They were not gored to the quick, but it put an end to their illiberal and indecorous rejoicing. They presently proposed that all the pieces should be taken down. We supposed however, that if that true picture produced so good an effect a longer sight of it could work no harm; so the effort to take them down was decidedly checked and they all continued where they were placed until next morning. Many copies have been taken by gentlemen and ladies, and I should not be surprised if they were silly enough to publish them—that is all but the seventh set, which I observe are omitted in the copies. If they should, we can give the whole of it.

If Clay comes here, there will doubtless be great doings. I am determined to see it out, and see how these manworshipers will carry their servile idolatry. I hope they will be civil and orderly, having some regard for the feelings of others. This is a public place, and in a free country, and ther are a few here who think and feel as Americans ought. You have no conceptioni to what an extent the feelings of the “Coalitionists” here of both sexes carry them when politics are introduced, and it is they who always commence the subject. The ladies, however, now (being privileges) talk the loudest. The last set of verses has given most of the gentlemen their quietus. They have some suspicion that, althoughw we are worms, yet when trodden upon we will turn. Considering all things, we are quite friendly and sociable. We are always—eating, drinking (not sleeping) dancing, singing, promenading, playing nine-pins or in some other amusements the place affords—and it is only now and then our moments area embittered by some illiberal remark about our candidate and friend, or some of his party; for you know, we must retort, and then a [setto] commences, which however, soon must terminate, as it is against the order of the day for any thing, even one kind of fun, to continue a long time.

I have omitted this bore upon you out of idleness. It will be well if you thought of handing it to a boy to read it for you. But I thought it well enough to send you a cop0y of verses as you might get an imperfect one.

Yours truly,

J. F. Lytle

Morgan Neveille, Esq.

This letter before me is postmarked Yellow Springs, Aug. 22, 1840; is sealed in oldtime fashion, with a wafer, and being a double letter is marked, “Paid, 20 cents.”

 

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Forgotten Artist

Among the undated newspaper articles from unnamed sources found in the documents from Mary E. Morgan was a profile of an artist associated with the CCC Camp in the 1930s.

PEN AND INK DRAWINGS OF SCENERY ARE MADE BY FORESTRY ARTIST AT CCC CAMP

YELLOW SPRINGS, O., Nov. 16— Seriously injured by the explosion of a bomb when he was but 10 years old, and his hopes of becoming a portrait painter shattered by the depression, Steven Klissaroff, forestry artist at the John Bryan State Park CCC Camp, is achieving prominence for his pen and ink drawings.

Klissaroff was wounded by the explosion of a bomb in a public building in his home town, Skoplje, Macedonia, during the World War. He recovered slowly and came to the United States in 1920, going to Cleveland where he worked at manual labor in the daytime and studied art in the night school of the John Huntington Polytechnical Institute of Art. Since his childhood he has had the desire to become an artist.

Fifteen years of hard physical labor have resotred Klissaroff to health, but they have not dimmed his sense of delicate touch with an artist’s brush or his drawing pen. His perspective ink drawings show clearly the desirable light and shadow effect for which painters strive.

Lacking money with which to purchase canvas and oils, he turned to the only equipment which he could affo9rd—pen and ink—during his first enlistment with a CCC unit. Stationed on the Maumee River, near Toledo, in the summer of 1933.

Although Klissaroff enrolled from Cleveland as an ordinary laborer, he could not forget his ambition to be a recognized painter. “Sometimes I can’t sleep if I don’t make a drawing or two each day,” he declared.

Disappointed at first in not being able to continue with his oil painings, he is becoming more enthusiastic about his newly-discovered talent with pen and ink. “I think I’ll like pen and ink better than oil. It’s real delicate work,” he said as he displayed his best drawings.

Before joining the CCC, Klissaroff had never drawn any pictures of outdoor scenes. The scenery around the Park and Yellow Springs he described as “very beautiful,” and added that within two weeks after arrivinig at the camp “I began to see hundreds of interesting things to paint.”

Not severing entirely his connection with color paintings, Klissaroff has drawn in water color a number
of scenes of landscape and buildings in the Yellow Springs community. Several beautiful sunsets which appeared in this section during July and August were recorded by the artist’s brush. Nearly all of the water color pictures of local scenes were painted during his spare time.

Klissaroff’s official duties as forestry artist include the sketching, in perspective, of new furniture and buildings to be constructed at the camp. He also sketches plans for landscaping projects at the park.

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Why They Came — Pages 26 – 29

(Previous entries here, here, herehere, here and here.)

Morgan, Kettering and Birch are names mostly familiar to Yellow Springs residents and visitors, but the Little Peace Conference less so. Might there be current applications of the LPC, whether to returning veterans or other large-scale problems?

Page 26

Two men have had a profound impact on the recent history of Yellow Springs: Arthur E. Morgan, international authority on water conservation; Charles F. “Boss” Kettering, inventor of the self-starter and other automotive developments. Both were trustees of Antioch in 1919, when Morgan proposed a revolutionary plan for the college which combined study with work, theory with practice. Morgan was made president, June 17, 1920. To support the “new” college, Kettering underwrote a loan of $250,000.

The experiment attracted national attention, and the town supported it. When the Horace Mann house burned in 1921, the community raised $30,000 to help build a new library on the old foundation (right above).

Page 27

The Horatio Alger of Yellow Springs was Hugh Taylor Birch. As a farm boy, he spent most of his spare hours wandering in the Glen. He attended Antioch, but failed geometry, in 1869, and left to study law in Chicago. Following his spectacular success in law and real estate, he returned to Yellow Springs, bought 900 acres comprising the Glen, and built a large home at the southern end.

In 1929 Birch gave Antioch his acreage, combined with tracts purchased for Antioch by Jesse W. Armstrong, and dedicated the Glen to his daughter Helen.

Page 28

The Yellow Springs Little Peace Conference was filmed by the Office of War Information, and distributed in twenty-two languages as an example of a small community solving its postwar problems democratically.

The LPC was started in 1943 by a group of World War I veterans who remembered their readjustment in 1918. With representatives from all community organizations, the LPC outlined a program of community improvements and services which would enhance the homecoming of World War II servicemen.

The Conference met informally at Bill Pohlkotte’s Restaurant under the chairmanship of Mayor Lowell Fess. Shown below are typical meetings which preceded the general session, held at Bryan High, pictured on the following page.

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Historical Society Program March 12

For nearly 130 years, the Little Miami Railroad , one of the earliest in the state, brought the world to Yellow Springs, and carried Yellow Springs to the world. Come hear Dave Neuhardt tell the story of Ohio’s pioneer railroad and how it shaped the Village and all of southwest Ohio.

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“Yellow Springs Zoo”

Another newspaper article from an unnamed source dated July 6, 1941.

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1896 Giveaway — Weight by Bushel/Holiday/Mayors..

The list of weights by bushel is a good indication of those items of general use in 1896.

The list of mayors contains many names familiar from previous posts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUSHEL MEASURE BY WEIGHT

Bushels of…………………………………..Lbs.
Wheat…………………………………………..60
Shelled corn………………………………….56
Corn in the ear………………………………70
Peas…………………………………………….60
Rye……………………………………………..56
Oats…………………………………………….32
Barley………………………………………….48
Irish potatoes………………………………..60
Sweet potatoes (in Maryland…………..56
White beans………………………………….60
Salt………………………………………………50
Stove coal…………………………………….80
Malt……………………………………………..38
Bran……………………………………………..20
Turnips………………………………………….55
Castor beans…………………………………..46
Clover seed……………………………………60
Timothy seed………………………………….45
Flax seed………………………………………..56
Hemp seed……………………………………..44
Blue grass seed……………………………….14
Buckwheat……………………………………..52
Dried peaches…………………………………33
Dried apples……………………………………24
Onions……………………………………………54
Plastering hair…………………………………..8
Corn meal………………………………………48

LEGAL HOLIDAYS

New Year’s Day……………………………Jan. 1.
Washington’s birthday………………….Feb.22.
Memorial day……………………………..May 30.
Independence day………………………..July 4.
Labor day…………………………………..Sept. 2.
Christmas…………………………………..Dec. 25.
Thanksgiving day set by the President.
Usually last Thursday in November.
Arbor day set by the Governor.
MAYORS OF YELLOW SPRINGS
1856………………………………Isaac Kershiner
1857……………………………….Andrew Srowfe
1858………………………………J. W. Hamilton
1859………………………………J. W. Hamilton
1860…………………………………..H. Davis
1861……………………………..A. B. Wambagh
1862……………………………..J. W. Hamilton
1863……………………………..J. W. Hamilton
1864………………………………F. D. Leanord
1865………………………………..E. M. Birch
1866………………………………J. G. G. Adams
1867…………………………..W. G. Whitehurst
1868 to 1878………………….J. W. Hamilton
1878…………………………………..W. W. Carr
1880……………………………..J. W. Hamilton
1882………………………………….J. J. Hurst
1884 to 1888………………………C. E. Adams
1890………………………………..T. E. Stewart
1892……………………………………J. E. Lynn
1894…………………………..Charles Hamilton
1896…………………………..Charles Hamilton

TOWNSHIP OFFICERS Elected April 6:

Trustees: Harry R. Estle, Charles E. Adams.
Clerk: Towne Carlisle.
Assessors: Jacob Stutsman, W. Precinct. W. B. Todd, E. Precinct.
Cemetery Trustee: J. W. Confer
Justice of Peace: George B. Smith

Yellow Springs Items of Interest

1882: Streets lighted. 68 gasolinie lamps.
1881: First telephone at Yellow Springs
1884: Highest stage of the Yellow Springs branch, May 12th.
D. A. Long, president of Antioch college.
DI. 1896: Mrs. Oella Munch appointed Postmistress March 9th.

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Horace Mann’s Beds

Among the documents collected by Mary E. Morgan were various articles clipped from newspapers pertaining to Yellow Springs history. Although many had the date of the paper handwritten on the copy, few had the name of the newspaper noted. The transcript below  was found in this collection.

Newspaper articles are a particular challenge for both professional archivists and family history collectors due to the rapid breakdown of newspaper stock, so it is important to either photocopy and/or scan articles to preserve both the content and the graphic history (font style, e.g.).

[2/16/36 handwritten, newspaper unknown]

HORACE MANN OWNED TWO BEDS
Both Now In Possession Of Antioch College As Authentic Relics Of First Prexy

This is a story of two beds. Not twin beds, but two separate unique ones which are the only antique relics Antioch College has of its first president, Horace Mann.

It should interest bed collectors and those whose favorite story is the one about the time they actually slept in the bed of So-and-So. (So-and-So, it might be interesting to say, is a noted poet, writer or musician, and it might be necessary to say, they are all long since dead.)

Horace Mann, although living in a time of staunch democracy, was a plutocrat in regard to beds. He had two. One was in New England, and later when he went literally in the 1850’s to educate it at Antioch College, he left bed No. 1 behind. It certainly can confirm anyone’s belief that Horace Mann was an optimist, for in 1854 Grand Rapids wasn’t exporting beds at some tiresome rate per day and “sleep-in-peace” mattresses were not to be had at every department store.

But soon after Mann arrived in Yellow Springs he acquired bed No. 2. This was a sleigh bed a common enough variety of the day. It had white and gold flowers. No one knows whether or not it was comfortable, for nothing escaped either from Mann’s lips or pen concerning its comforts.

Whenever bed collectors allowed bed No. 1 to leave the New England bedrock of antiques is not known, but a number of years ago Antioch College received the piece of furniture. It was placed in the guest room of the women’s dormitory, and as a guest was shown to her room, she was informed that she was about to occupy the bed which Horace Mann had occupied in New England. At present it is in the guest room of the home of the dean of women.

With the recent death of Miss Lucy Porterfield, a lifelong resident of Yellow Springs and a one-time student at Antioch, the second slumber antique becomes the property of the college. She willed it to Antioch with the stipulation that it bear a plate stating it had been Horace Mann’s bed and that it was her gift to the college.

Redecorated by one of the present Antioch art students, bed No. 2 now occupies the guest room of the assistant to the pesident. It’s a two to three chance that guests of Antioch College will occupy one or the other of the antique pieces of furniture.

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