1896 Giveaway — Weight by Bushel/Holiday/Mayors..

The list of weights by bushel is a good indication of those items of general use in 1896.

The list of mayors contains many names familiar from previous posts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUSHEL MEASURE BY WEIGHT

Bushels of…………………………………..Lbs.
Wheat…………………………………………..60
Shelled corn………………………………….56
Corn in the ear………………………………70
Peas…………………………………………….60
Rye……………………………………………..56
Oats…………………………………………….32
Barley………………………………………….48
Irish potatoes………………………………..60
Sweet potatoes (in Maryland…………..56
White beans………………………………….60
Salt………………………………………………50
Stove coal…………………………………….80
Malt……………………………………………..38
Bran……………………………………………..20
Turnips………………………………………….55
Castor beans…………………………………..46
Clover seed……………………………………60
Timothy seed………………………………….45
Flax seed………………………………………..56
Hemp seed……………………………………..44
Blue grass seed……………………………….14
Buckwheat……………………………………..52
Dried peaches…………………………………33
Dried apples……………………………………24
Onions……………………………………………54
Plastering hair…………………………………..8
Corn meal………………………………………48

LEGAL HOLIDAYS

New Year’s Day……………………………Jan. 1.
Washington’s birthday………………….Feb.22.
Memorial day……………………………..May 30.
Independence day………………………..July 4.
Labor day…………………………………..Sept. 2.
Christmas…………………………………..Dec. 25.
Thanksgiving day set by the President.
Usually last Thursday in November.
Arbor day set by the Governor.
MAYORS OF YELLOW SPRINGS
1856………………………………Isaac Kershiner
1857……………………………….Andrew Srowfe
1858………………………………J. W. Hamilton
1859………………………………J. W. Hamilton
1860…………………………………..H. Davis
1861……………………………..A. B. Wambagh
1862……………………………..J. W. Hamilton
1863……………………………..J. W. Hamilton
1864………………………………F. D. Leanord
1865………………………………..E. M. Birch
1866………………………………J. G. G. Adams
1867…………………………..W. G. Whitehurst
1868 to 1878………………….J. W. Hamilton
1878…………………………………..W. W. Carr
1880……………………………..J. W. Hamilton
1882………………………………….J. J. Hurst
1884 to 1888………………………C. E. Adams
1890………………………………..T. E. Stewart
1892……………………………………J. E. Lynn
1894…………………………..Charles Hamilton
1896…………………………..Charles Hamilton

TOWNSHIP OFFICERS Elected April 6:

Trustees: Harry R. Estle, Charles E. Adams.
Clerk: Towne Carlisle.
Assessors: Jacob Stutsman, W. Precinct. W. B. Todd, E. Precinct.
Cemetery Trustee: J. W. Confer
Justice of Peace: George B. Smith

Yellow Springs Items of Interest

1882: Streets lighted. 68 gasolinie lamps.
1881: First telephone at Yellow Springs
1884: Highest stage of the Yellow Springs branch, May 12th.
D. A. Long, president of Antioch college.
DI. 1896: Mrs. Oella Munch appointed Postmistress March 9th.

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Horace Mann’s Beds

Among the documents collected by Mary E. Morgan were various articles clipped from newspapers pertaining to Yellow Springs history. Although many had the date of the paper handwritten on the copy, few had the name of the newspaper noted. The transcript below  was found in this collection.

Newspaper articles are a particular challenge for both professional archivists and family history collectors due to the rapid breakdown of newspaper stock, so it is important to either photocopy and/or scan articles to preserve both the content and the graphic history (font style, e.g.).

[2/16/36 handwritten, newspaper unknown]

HORACE MANN OWNED TWO BEDS
Both Now In Possession Of Antioch College As Authentic Relics Of First Prexy

This is a story of two beds. Not twin beds, but two separate unique ones which are the only antique relics Antioch College has of its first president, Horace Mann.

It should interest bed collectors and those whose favorite story is the one about the time they actually slept in the bed of So-and-So. (So-and-So, it might be interesting to say, is a noted poet, writer or musician, and it might be necessary to say, they are all long since dead.)

Horace Mann, although living in a time of staunch democracy, was a plutocrat in regard to beds. He had two. One was in New England, and later when he went literally in the 1850’s to educate it at Antioch College, he left bed No. 1 behind. It certainly can confirm anyone’s belief that Horace Mann was an optimist, for in 1854 Grand Rapids wasn’t exporting beds at some tiresome rate per day and “sleep-in-peace” mattresses were not to be had at every department store.

But soon after Mann arrived in Yellow Springs he acquired bed No. 2. This was a sleigh bed a common enough variety of the day. It had white and gold flowers. No one knows whether or not it was comfortable, for nothing escaped either from Mann’s lips or pen concerning its comforts.

Whenever bed collectors allowed bed No. 1 to leave the New England bedrock of antiques is not known, but a number of years ago Antioch College received the piece of furniture. It was placed in the guest room of the women’s dormitory, and as a guest was shown to her room, she was informed that she was about to occupy the bed which Horace Mann had occupied in New England. At present it is in the guest room of the home of the dean of women.

With the recent death of Miss Lucy Porterfield, a lifelong resident of Yellow Springs and a one-time student at Antioch, the second slumber antique becomes the property of the college. She willed it to Antioch with the stipulation that it bear a plate stating it had been Horace Mann’s bed and that it was her gift to the college.

Redecorated by one of the present Antioch art students, bed No. 2 now occupies the guest room of the assistant to the pesident. It’s a two to three chance that guests of Antioch College will occupy one or the other of the antique pieces of furniture.

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Display of Local Figures in Black History

Be sure to take a look at the front vestibule window of the Yellow Springs Community Library throughout February. Jean Payne, board member of the Yellow Springs Historical Society, with the assistance of Scott Sanders (archivist at Antioch College) has put together a display highlighting five African-American notables in Yellow Springs history.

As a sample, here is one of the five profiles:

J. Elmer Spyglass

James Elmer Spyglass was born November 1, 1877 in Springfield on South Limestone Street. He was musically gifted, and sang in Yellow Springs as a choir boy, and later performing in concerts and music halls. A year at Toledo Conservatory of Music encouraged him to pursue classical music studies in Europe. There, in 1906, almost penniless and with his opera dreams crushed, Spyglass found success singing Negro spirituals in the concerts and music halls throughout the Netherlands, France and Germany.

In 1930, after twenty years of singing to an adoring Europe, Spyglass retired to the suburbs of Schwalbach, outside Frankfurt, Germany. As the start of World War II came Spyglass had to report weekly to the local authorities as an “enemy alien”. He was so well liked by the Germans that he was not interned during World War I or World War II. When his house was bombed in 1944 by Allied planes, he helped his neighbors with their losses as well as his own damage.

After the war, Spyglass immediately contacted the American military to ensure a solid relationship with the people of Schwalbach and the American occupying forces. Spyglass worked to establish good communications between both parties. Spyglass helping find food for his community, which was scarce, as well as helped German citizens through a “denazification period”. His skills working with military and civilian problems impressed the American commanders and Spyglass was given the role of Chief Receptionist at the American Consulate.

Spyglass submitted an autobiography to the State Department for clearance titled “Where There’s a Will There’s a Way”. It was lost after it was sent to the State Department and was never printed.

He died in Schwalbach in February 16, 1957. The American Consul General, Mr. John Burns, the Mayor, Councilors and many of Schwalbach’s citizens attended his memorial service. James Elmer Spyglass was cremated and, per his request, was brought back to Ohio and buried next to his mother and cousin in the Yellow Springs Glen Forest Cemetery.

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1910s Cemetery Book — Pages 20 and 21

There seemed to be a high percentage of still born infants during the summer of 1916.

Some familiar names — Sroufe and Carlisle, for two.

Page 20
April 7, 1916 — Mary E. Leffel — La Grippe — Springfield
April 21, 1916 — Florence Louise Fawcett — Bronchopneumonia — Near Old Town, Ohio
April 29, 1916 — Stillborn Infant, Sanford — Stillborn — Springfield
April 29, 1916 — Infant Pettiford — Premature Birth — Yellow Springs, Ohio
May 3, 1916 — Robt. B. Carlisle — Carcinoma of Lingual{?} glands — Dayton, Ohio
May 19, 1916 — C. J. Richadson — Bronchial Pneumonia — Springfield, Ohio
June 7, 1916 — Grace E. Strauss — Diabetes Acidosis — Yellow Springs, Ohio
June 12, 1916 — Lucille Lefevre — Pneumonia — Yellow Springs, Ohio
June 23, 1916 — Mildred Anna Carlisle — Acidosis — Yellow Springs, Ohio
July 3, 1916 — Emma Bailey — Infection — Springfield, Ohio
July 10, 1916 — Geo. McCullough — Diabetes — Springfield, Ohio
July 15, 1916 — Ella May Johnson — Apoplexy — Springfield, Ohio
July 17, 1916 — Abraham L. Record — Mitral Insufficiency — Muncie, Indiana

Page 21
July 24, 1916 — John E. Henchie — Endocarditis — Springfield, Ohio
July 31, 1916 — Mary M. Rahn — Paralyis of bowels — Springfield, Ohio
August 15, 1916 — Moses West — Mitral Insufficiency — Yellow Springs, Ohio
August 17, 1916 — Laura Maria Sroufe — Carcinoma of breast — Yellow Springs, Ohio
August 21, 1916 — Stillborn babe of Mr. & Mrs. Earl Frost — Still born — Near Hustead, Ohio
August 26, 1916 — Alice Jane Applegate — Hepatic Neoplasm —Yellow Springs, Ohio
September 5, 1916 — Infant Male Hardy — Accidental, injured during instrumental delivery — Yellow Springs, Ohio
September 12, 1916 — Wm. Allen Sroufe — Carcinoma of larynx — Yellow Springs, Ohio
September 23, 1916 — David E. Brown (Babe) — Marasmus — Dayton, Oho
October 23, 1916 —Hilda M. Gerhardt — Pelvic Abscess Appendical & Ovarian inflammation — Year Yellow Springs, Ohio
November 8, 1916 — Alvio Higgins — Passive congestion of lungs — Dayton, Ohio
December 8, 1916 — Robert B. Carlisle — Cancere of Prostate Gland — Yellow Springs, Ohio
November 9, 1916 — Infant of Mrs. Bertha Carlisle Palumbo — Still born — Yellow Springs, Ohio

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Name Challenge

Two curious names connected to each other have a connection to Yellow Springs. Can you identify them?

Erip Evifle

Coddington Chesebrough

 

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From the Antioch Bookplate Archives — 1970s part 7

Introducing new bookplate designs was always a balancing act. Unlike bookmarks, which are a true “impulse item,” bookplates imply using them for a number of years, so striking a balance between classic and contemporary, generic or special interest, was an ongoing concern.

The three National Gallery of Art designs and the one from the National Cowboy Hall of Fame fall on the “classic” part of the continuum.

Antioch bookplate B-105

B-105 “Young Girl Reading” Painting circa 1776 by Jean Honore Fragonard. Used with permission of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Antioch bookplate B-106

B-106 “My Gems”
Detail from farm scene originally painted on a window shade by an anonymous American artist of the late 19th centuray, used with permission of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Antioch bookplate B-107

B-107 “Mahantango Valley Farm”
Detail from farm scene originally painted on a window shade by an anonymous American artist of the late 19th centuray, used with permission of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Antioch bookplate B-108

B-108 “When Things Are Quiet”
1910 oil painting by Philip R. Goodwin, part of the permanent collection of the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, used with their permission

 

 

Antioch bookplate B-109

B-109

Antioch bookplate B-110

B-110, in honor the the national Bicentennial

 

 

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1905 Property Auction

Auctions are still used to accomplish property transfer, and a listing of the auctioned property from over 100 years ago sheds a light on what was valued.

We find out from her will that Rena Wire was Mrs. Confer’s sister, likely why the residence of Mrs. Wm. G. Confer was used as the location for the auction of Mrs. Wire’s goods. The executor George Cost was her brother.

From the 1900 census, Samuel Wire, a farmer, and his wife Rena lived on King Street and apparently had no children. Samuel predeceased Rena some time in 1903, and both are buried in Fairfield Cemetery  in Fairborn.

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Dramatic Memory

Found in material collected for the Historical Society by Mary E. Morgan, this actor’s handout not only conveys the actor’s history, but a technological history as well.

The purple print on the reverse was not an aesthetic choice, but indicated the manner of reproduction of the time: the ditto machine. No one who ran off copies via ditto will easily forget the scent of fresh ditto ink.

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Why They Came — Pages 22 – 25

(Previous entries here, here, herehere, and here.)

John Bryan and C. H. Ellis have been the subject of previous posts, and if you are curious to learn more about them, just type their names in the “search ” box at left.

Page 22

Page 23

Page 24

Page 25

Page 22

Simeon Fess, Senator from Ohio, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, revitalized Antioch during his presidency, 1907-1917. He increased the student body and faculty, brought the first Chautauquas to Yellow Springs as part of the College’s summer school, strengthened the institution’s endowment.

John Bryan’s atheism stirred up many a controversy in his lifetime (1855-1918), but a greater one occurred after his death. His bequest of 500 acres for a public park was rejected by the county, the state, and the governor because of a clause which prohibited “public worship.” The gift was later accecpted. The famous Bryan barn is shown at left.

Page 23

Yellow Springs’ water, light, sewer, and gas systems were all developed by C. H. “Herb” Ellis, utilities superintendent from 1911 to 1946. First attracted public notices as ambidextrous pitcher for Antioch baseball team; later became village clerk, bicycling census enumerator, newspaperman, postmaster, school board member. In 1955, Village Council named a recreational park in Ellis’ honor. Ellis is shown, above, in his role as postmaster.

Irene Hawes served for many years as the village telephone operator. She is shown above, left, at her switchboard, in a photo taken in 1903.

A number of fires which wiped out buildings on Dayton and Corry Streets (shown below is the fire of 1895) resulted in a gradual shift of the business district to Xenia Avenue after the turn of the century.

Page 24

After 1900, Yellow Springs declined as a resort center. In 1902, the famous Yellow Springs House Hotel burned to the ground. In the same year the “traction line” between Xenia and Springfield came through town. It served as an important transportation fcility for thirty years.

Yellow Springs became a kind of haven for retired farmers, and the character of its downtown can be seen from the photographs at lower right.

The Whitehall Farm, whose colorful history began in 1805, entered an era of prosperity in 1900, brought by the success of Mr. E. S. Kelly, founder of the Kelly-Springfield Tire Co., and pioneer in the manufacture of rubber tires. A house party at Whitehall Farm is shown above, right, the photograph taken about 1902.

Page 25

During the era of the traction line, The Yellow Springs Pavillion in Neff Park continued to serve as a picnic center for this area. The station for the Pavillion is shown at left.

The entire faculty of Antioch College in 1920 is pictured in the photograph above, with William Dawson, the president.

“Little Antich,” the famous school building erected in 1855 by William Mills, at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Walnut Street, had lost some of its elegance in the twenties, and was used as a residence.

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Reminder: Special Joint Arts Council/Historical Society Program January 20

Beyond Flour and Sugar” – Wheeling Gaunt’ story, including music and the the unveiling of a bust of Gaunt.

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